‘Don’t just take our word for it’ … with thanks and acknowledgment to Marc Santacroce – USA …15 August 2018

‘Don’t just take our word for it’ … with thanks and acknowledgment to Marc Santacroce – USA …15 August 2018

This review, from Marc Santacroce, a CFI from the USA, was also posted on 3 February 2015, on our testimonials page, www.jacobson.flare.com/testimonials  .

So, once again in my flying life (started in 1965), I am faced with getting back up to speed on my aviation skills after another extended absence. I am not a high time pilot, just now 2000 PPSEL hours, and I’m probably the ONLY pilot you know who will admit he’s NOT the best pilot of all time. I don’t test well, I have to constantly study to stay on top, and I have to frequently practice my basic maneuvers, as well as my instrument skills.

This last two year hiatus has taken it’s toll, for one I’m older, and aviation has changed in leaps and bounds the past five years. I have to work harder to keep up, and consequently look for any way to make life easier.

The Jacobson Flare App is one of those aids that make life easier. The App will cost you about what an hour with a CFI will cost, and it is worth every penny.

When I was transitioning from my PPSEL to working on my instrument, I couldn’t find one, not one, instructor who could explain why we teach VFR flight one way and IFR flight another. Of course I’m referring to the perennial debate over whether power or pitch control rate or speed.

Capt Jacobson takes you through a rational analysis of what happens using both methods, then presents a compelling argument of why the “flightpath” method is more effective, and easier to master, than the “airspeed” method.

Three months ago, when I first started using the Jacobson Flare (coincidentally with flying an airplane I hadn’t touched in over 5 years), I found his techniques a struggle. Then, after three practice flights, I nailed it – consistently. Two more months passed (when I couldn’t afford to fly), and I lost my touch again. I emailed Capt Jacobson and he quickly diagnosed my problem as “fixation” on the aim point and flare point. “Open your field of vision”, he said. Today I went up, in a newer, more powerful model of the same airplane and bingo, I got it down.

After 45 minutes of air work, when I was probably too tired to do my best, I hit the pattern for 10 landings. All but one were spot on, and that one was just a longer landing because I hadn’t reduced power as much, and as soon as I should have. I intentionally flew some steep, and some shallow approaches to landing, as well as the optimum 3-4 degree approach, and the J-Flare method works.

Once you earn to work with aim point and flare point, and not be so concerned about HAT, your landings will become more consistent and more predictable. On my way back to home field, I gave a newly minted multi- engine pilot a lift. He couldn’t believe my landing. I took the opportunity to sing the Jacobson Flare praises and give him a 30 second tutorial. His only comment was that the method made total sense. Let me commend it to you too. Everyone says that mastering the landings was the hardest part of learning to fly. Do it the Jacobson Flare way, and they won’t be.

Marc Santacroce
San Francisco CA, USA’

 

Captain David M Jacobson FRAeS MAP

www.jacobsonflare.com/how-to-land-a-plane/

The Jacobson Flare App for iPad

Simple, Unassailable Aerodynamic Logic

David Jacobson