Post from David Jacobson

‘New pilots, pilots transitioning from one type of airplane to another, and those of us with experience ‘on type’ will all benefit from this.’ Tom Turner – American Bonanza Society ASF- 26 March 2015

‘New pilots, pilots transitioning from one type of airplane to another, and those of us with experience ‘on type’ will all benefit from this.’ Tom Turner – American Bonanza Society ASF- 26 March 2015

If you have trouble visualizing your aim point or the timing and execution of your flare, and your instructor (or another instructor) isn’t successful in guiding you to that enlightenment, consider the following resource:

  • David Jacobson’s ‘The Jacobson Flare’, a fee-based iPad app. I met Captain Jacobson (a retired Qantas Airways pilot and training captain) last week at the Australian Bonanza Society’s BPPP, Narromine NSW, and before that took his very informative and high-quality app-based course (Disclosure: He gave me free access so I could see his presentation before we met). New pilots, pilots transitioning from one type of airplane to another, and those of us with experience “in type” will all benefit from this.

See www.jacobsonflare.com/

 ‘A good landing comes from a good approach. Technique for making a good approach changes from one pilot to the next, and may even vary from one landing to the next for the same pilot. Regardless, another landing best practice is to make the final portion of your approach stabilized. This means being:
  • In configuration (flaps set for landing; retractable landing gear extended);
  • In alignment with the runway centerline, compensating for crosswind, …by the time you pass through 500 feet above the runway on final approach and continually thereafter, until beginning your flare;
  • On glidepath (aim point steady in the correct position in your windscreen) and;
  • On speed (recommended or computed landing speed for airplane weight, flap position and gust conditions).

If you do not meet all four criteria consistently for the last 500 feet of your descent, or if at any time in the last 500 feet your aim point indicates you’ll overshoot your aim point (and therefore your planned touchdown point), then GO AROUND – power up, pitch up, clean up and climb away…and set it up correctly next time.’

Thomas P. Turner, M.S. Aviation Safety, MCFI
Executive Director – Air Safety Foundation
American Bonanza Society
Wichita, KS, USA